Maggie Robinson


Sep 13
2008
Pulling Up Weeds

We had to tear out the tomato plants the other day. Maine was very rainy this summer, and even though there were lots of green and pink globes on the vine, they were rotting and bug-infested. Being the cautious soul I am, I wanted to look over each one, just to make sure. My beloved husband just ripped them out and threw them into the woods.

This approach to the tomato plants can be viewed on so many levels. Me: I make excuses, I live in hope. Venus. Him: Scorched earth, take no prisoners. Mars.

I wonder how people can see the same things but interpret them so differently. This political season is particularly rife with diametrically opposed viewpoints. I wonder what it is about my face that indicates I’d like to engage in debate. I’m an independent voter, so there’s no bumper sticker on my car. I don’t wear buttons or partisan T-shirts. But I listened politely as the furnace repairman lectured me on socialism in my basement yesterday. I kind of wondered what century he was living in. Just last week the copier repairman gave me the same spiel in the faculty room at school. There must be something in the toner or on talk radio.

But getting rid of the bad tomatoes reminds me of editing. Sometimes you just have to delete the words. Root out the evil. Vote the bums out.
I have a bumper sticker now.
Is this campaign season affecting you? Are you a proponent of the Venus-Mars theory? How did your garden grow?

8 comments to “Pulling Up Weeds”

  1. Elyssa Papa
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    1
     · September 14th, 2008 at 12:09 pm · Link

    It’s so important to vote, no matter what you’re political leanings. If you don’t like something or a political party, vote for the person you do like.

    This was a great blog.

    I’m right there with you, Maggie in showing my support via t-shirts, etc. *g*



  2. irisheyes
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    2
     · September 14th, 2008 at 9:15 pm · Link

    LOL Maggie! You and I must have the same look on our faces. My FIL tried to trap me into a political discussion about Palin yesterday!

    FIL: Hey, Irish, did you see those interviews they did with Palin?
    ME: No.
    FIL: Did you read what she said?
    ME: No.
    FIL: Oh. (End of discussion!)

    Surprising how that fun little word shut him right down. I discuss politics with very few people. He is definitely not one of them.

    I completely adhere to the Venus/Mars theory. Although, sometimes, depending on the situation I believe that the DH and I have our Venus and Mars switched! LOL He’s the gardener and I’m the one that wants to pitch it all.



  3. Tiffany Kenzie
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     · September 15th, 2008 at 6:09 am · Link

    That was a fun blog!

    We are coming into voting a new Premiere too. Another early election cause we do not have a majority government here.

    And I love the American politics. Lots of Canadians talking about what’s going on down there.

    I’m with Irish… Venus/Mars mixed up! BUT I am an aries so that makes sense! LOL



  4. terrio
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    4
     · September 15th, 2008 at 9:25 am · Link

    I must have switched from Venus to Mars this weekend because I’ve been pitching things left and right! LOL!

    This reminds me, I have to change my address and find out where I’ll be voting in the new place. I hope it’s not too late. That’s what happened to me the last time, I moved in 2004 right before the election and got shut out. Gosh, I hope this doesn’t mean I’ll be moving this time again in 2012.

    I love to debate, but I only know enough about politics to be slightly dangerous. *g*



  5. Marnee Jo
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    5
     · September 15th, 2008 at 1:54 pm · Link

    I’m actually obsessed with CNN right now. I’m watching every little bit of the campaigns.

    And Irish, I swear, we’re seperated at birth. My FIL tries to rile me up all the time. Yikes. Dangerous.

    Venus/Mars, huh? I think I’m more the take no prisoners, get rid of it sort. Hmmm… How strange.



  6. BernardL
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     · September 15th, 2008 at 5:47 pm · Link

    Socialism/Communism fails everywhere it’s tried, and is the death of the human spirit. Group think is group death. As to the election, for the first time in a long while I can vote for someone, rather than the lessor of two evils. Governor Palin represents and states so many of my own beliefs, the choice is clear for me. I don’t put up signs on my building, or impose my beliefs on the customers in my shop. If you are in the service business as I am, it is business suicide to campaign politically.

    As to bumper stickers, Maggie, if it’s an Obama/Biden sticker, no harm will come to your vehicle. If it’s a McCain sticker, don’t risk damage to your ride.



  7. Maggie Robinson
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    7
     · September 16th, 2008 at 6:55 am · Link

    LOL, Bernard. I’ll never tell. My parents told me NEVER to discuss politics and religion, and although I haven’t always done what I’m told, that’s one bit of advice I’m following now.

    Ely, I’m doing a nonpartisan voter registration drive at my high school. Everybody vote early and vote often!

    Irish, I never met my father-in-law. But my husband says he was very active in his political party—not mine. He probably would have disapproved of me. *g*

    Tiff, every time we travel to Canada we listen to Canadian politics, which I don’t understand at all.American stuff is confusing enough!

    Terrio and Marnee Jo (ooh, it rhymes), in my real storage life, I throw crap out left and right too…eventually.



  8. Janga
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     · September 16th, 2008 at 8:03 am · Link

    Hurrah fot you, Maggie. I wish voter registration was a regular part of the high school experience across the country.

    When I was a senior (back in the dark ages), we had an annual Citizenship Day with an assembly where all those old enough to register were given certificates. Then we filled buses and went to the courthouse to register. Granted it was corny, and we were more excited about missing third period history or math or whatever than about elections, but it sent a clear message that voting was important, that it was one more part of becoming an adult. Maybe that’s one of the reasons 73% of my generation voted in 2004.